Polygon

Apr 16

Indies don’t know everything, and that’s good for aspiring developers
Indie developers don’t know everything about their own business, and that means that aspiring indies shouldn’t talk themselves out of entering the industry, according to the “core team” behind the Indie Megabooth at PAX Prime 2014.
Christopher Floyd, an indie developer who also serves as the Megabooth’s operations manager, offered a unique brand of encouragement to those in the audience who want to make games.
(Link to the full story)

Indies don’t know everything, and that’s good for aspiring developers

Indie developers don’t know everything about their own business, and that means that aspiring indies shouldn’t talk themselves out of entering the industry, according to the “core team” behind the Indie Megabooth at PAX Prime 2014.

Christopher Floyd, an indie developer who also serves as the Megabooth’s operations manager, offered a unique brand of encouragement to those in the audience who want to make games.

(Link to the full story)

The Division dev on Watch Dogs: it’s ‘tremendously important’ knowing when to delay
Delaying a game may incur additional costs and fan ire, but in the end it’s important for a developer to recognize when a game needs additional incubation time for quality purposes, Tom Clancy’s The Division managing director David Polfeldt told The Examiner.
According to Polfeldt, it is “tremendously important” that developers and publishers know when to take a hit and delay a game. He said that Ubisoft’s stock shares fell 25 percent the day the company announced its highly-anticipated open-world hacking game Watch Dogs had been delayed from October 2013 into 2014.
(Link to the full story)

The Division dev on Watch Dogs: it’s ‘tremendously important’ knowing when to delay

Delaying a game may incur additional costs and fan ire, but in the end it’s important for a developer to recognize when a game needs additional incubation time for quality purposes, Tom Clancy’s The Division managing director David Polfeldt told The Examiner.

According to Polfeldt, it is “tremendously important” that developers and publishers know when to take a hit and delay a game. He said that Ubisoft’s stock shares fell 25 percent the day the company announced its highly-anticipated open-world hacking game Watch Dogs had been delayed from October 2013 into 2014.

(Link to the full story)

Heroes of the Storm hands-on: learning to MOBA
I was as excited as I was nervous to play Heroes of the Storm.
I know MOBAs, but I have limited experience with the multiplayer online battle arena genre. Developer Blizzard Entertainment calls Heroes of the Storm an “online team brawler,” but it’s the same idea you’ll find in games like Dota 2 and League of Legends. You fight for control of lanes. Players control heroes. Battles ebb and flow as each side whollops other players, their AI minions and towers in a battle of attrition leading to the others’ base.
(Link to the full story)

Heroes of the Storm hands-on: learning to MOBA

I was as excited as I was nervous to play Heroes of the Storm.

I know MOBAs, but I have limited experience with the multiplayer online battle arena genre. Developer Blizzard Entertainment calls Heroes of the Storm an “online team brawler,” but it’s the same idea you’ll find in games like Dota 2 and League of Legends. You fight for control of lanes. Players control heroes. Battles ebb and flow as each side whollops other players, their AI minions and towers in a battle of attrition leading to the others’ base.

(Link to the full story)

Apr 15

From gatekeepers to guns for hire: The new role of indie game publishers
The role of a publisher used to be simple, although the business itself is complex. They would fund your game, they would make sure it was released on consoles or the PC and in exchange they would often own the intellectual property behind the game and take a cut of profits. You needed a publisher to get on consoles and to make sure your game found an audience. They held the keys to the kingdom.
This is no longer the case, and the idea of what a publisher does or doesn’t do, or whether they’re ever needed for smaller developers, is rapidly evolving.
(Link to the full story)

From gatekeepers to guns for hire: The new role of indie game publishers

The role of a publisher used to be simple, although the business itself is complex. They would fund your game, they would make sure it was released on consoles or the PC and in exchange they would often own the intellectual property behind the game and take a cut of profits. You needed a publisher to get on consoles and to make sure your game found an audience. They held the keys to the kingdom.

This is no longer the case, and the idea of what a publisher does or doesn’t do, or whether they’re ever needed for smaller developers, is rapidly evolving.

(Link to the full story)

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