Polygon

Apr 23

[video]

[video]

The best of 2024 in gaming will reshape gambling, pro-sports and the food we eat
In the future, video games will have their own Oscars and the nominees for 2024’s awards will include games that let you print 3D food, gamify a mash-up of gambling and savings accounts, and earn real-world power-ups for your favorite pro sports teams.
Speaking to a packed auditorium at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts at New York University for the kick-off of this year’s Games for Change Festival, author and game designer Jane McGonigal walked the audience through the idea of ten-year forecasting and how it impacts game design.
(Link to the full story)

The best of 2024 in gaming will reshape gambling, pro-sports and the food we eat

In the future, video games will have their own Oscars and the nominees for 2024’s awards will include games that let you print 3D food, gamify a mash-up of gambling and savings accounts, and earn real-world power-ups for your favorite pro sports teams.

Speaking to a packed auditorium at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts at New York University for the kick-off of this year’s Games for Change Festival, author and game designer Jane McGonigal walked the audience through the idea of ten-year forecasting and how it impacts game design.

(Link to the full story)

Museum acquires ‘virtually complete’ source code from Atari’s arcade heyday
Acquiring the source code to virtually every coin-op game Atari made when it dominated the early 1980s arcade scene — Asteroids, Missile Command, Centipede — would seem to be enough of a coup. Yet for Jeremy Saucier, the most intimate contact with that era comes in the thousands and thousands of pages of paperwork, much of it routine.
Test-market reports. Focus group results. Written intel on what someone at Atari, for example, thought of Williams’ Joust, how that was going to do as a competitor, and what Atari should do in reply.
(Link to the full story)

Museum acquires ‘virtually complete’ source code from Atari’s arcade heyday

Acquiring the source code to virtually every coin-op game Atari made when it dominated the early 1980s arcade scene — Asteroids, Missile Command, Centipede — would seem to be enough of a coup. Yet for Jeremy Saucier, the most intimate contact with that era comes in the thousands and thousands of pages of paperwork, much of it routine.

Test-market reports. Focus group results. Written intel on what someone at Atari, for example, thought of Williams’ Joust, how that was going to do as a competitor, and what Atari should do in reply.

(Link to the full story)

Fract OSC review: dead or alive
Who knew club music could feel so lonely?
Fract OSC, a hybrid of rhythm, puzzle and exploration games, abandons you inside a broken synthesizer. It’s a dark and quiet cavern littered with orbs, boxes and planks that occasionally react to your existence. The environment is distant as it is cold. There are no characters, human or otherwise, and the architecture is sharp and alien. If your office copy machine could dream, perhaps this would be its fantasy: a Tron-like wasteland free of pesky humans.
Your job — as the only living thing here — is to fix the synthesizer from within.
Don’t expect any help.
(Link to the full review)

Fract OSC review: dead or alive

Who knew club music could feel so lonely?

Fract OSC, a hybrid of rhythm, puzzle and exploration games, abandons you inside a broken synthesizer. It’s a dark and quiet cavern littered with orbs, boxes and planks that occasionally react to your existence. The environment is distant as it is cold. There are no characters, human or otherwise, and the architecture is sharp and alien. If your office copy machine could dream, perhaps this would be its fantasy: a Tron-like wasteland free of pesky humans.

Your job — as the only living thing here — is to fix the synthesizer from within.

Don’t expect any help.

(Link to the full review)